top of page

Call for a Ban on the Harmful Legal Tactic of “Parental Alienation” and “Reunification Therapy”

Updated: Nov 10, 2023




November 8, 2023


Canadian survivors of Intimate Partner Violence and the family court system call on the Government of Canada and all Parliamentarians to protect Canadian children by implementing the recommendations of the report from the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and Girls, as per the 53rd session of the UN Human Rights Council, forthwith.


Petition e-4517 to the House of Commons has amassed over one thousand signatures. Attached is a letter supporting the petition which includes the support of over 60 Violence Against Women organizations. The letter was sent to leaders of federal political parties and the Prime Minister, the Right Honorable Justin Trudeau. It is attached to this release.


Parental Alienation is a legal tactic in family court that suggests that a protective parent (the parent with whom the child finds safety) has with intent caused a child to fear, dislike or avoid their abusive parent. The protective parent and/or child are oftentimes in these cases victims of domestic abuse/intimate partner violence.


Reunification Therapy is a legal tool used by abusive parents to separate the child from their protective parent and continue to exert control over the child and the protective parent, post-separation. Family courts in Canada have extradited children from Canada to attend reunification therapy in other countries. Family courts have forcibly removed children from the care of their protective parents to live primarily with the abusive parent, as an alternative to or in addition to Reunification Therapy.[1] These are all forms of post-separation abuse enacted on children and the protective parent with huge impacts to their psychological and physical well-being. These practices violate the Children’s Right to Safety under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.


To PROTECT the psychological and physical well-being of all children in Canada, we call on the Government of Canada and Parliamentarians to:


1. Enact legislative changes to prohibit the use of parental alienation and the associated pseudo-concepts as recommended by the UNHCR Special Rapporteur.

  • Parental Alienation and Reunification Therapy are tools used by an abuser to continue their control and abuse post-separation. It is a common legal tactic to counter abuse allegations.

  • 41.5% of PA cases involved IPV or child abuse. Of those, PA was alleged by the IPV perpetrator.[2]

  • IPV is deemed irrelevant to children’s best interest in 40% of cases where alienation is alleged. Women declared alienators suffered negative custody changes at a rate of 48%.[3]

2. Enact legislative changes to prohibit reunification therapy and its associated concepts (including but not limited to “education programs”). The practice of sending Canadian residents to foreign jurisdictions must be prohibited.


  • No formal training exists, nor has this practice been validated. In particular, “reunification camps” have been denounced in the aforementioned UN report.[4]

  • Canadian children are being sent to the United States to “reunification camps”. For example, in the case of Wilson v. Sinclair, the children, were sent to Turning Points in New York.[5]

3. Take concise measures, in partnership with all provinces and territories, to protect the Human Rights afforded by the Canadian Charter of Right and Freedoms, as well as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.


  • Despite “documented connections between coercive domestic violence and direct forms of child abuse as well as detrimental parenting practices”, the family court system continues to demonstrate limited understanding of the relationship between domestic violence and risk to children.[6]

  • Many cases of domestic homicide in the media demonstrate failure to consider risk factors for escalation, despite well documented research making these risk factors available such as Ontario’s Domestic Violence Death Review Committee’s 2018 Annual Report.[7] For example, two young boys were murdered in the Montreal area in August 2023 after the father was charged with Criminal Harassment of the mother.[8]

Those interested in joining the call to protect the safety and rights of Canadian children in this context are invited to send a letter to their Member of Parliament and their Member of Provincial Parliament. A sample letter can be found on here.


We can be reached through info@itbicanada.org for further information.



[1] Y.H.P. v. J.N., 2023 ONSC 5766 and Epshtein v. Verzberger-Epshtein 2021 ONSC 7694

[2] Neilson, L. (2018). Parental alienation empirical analysis: Child best interests or parental rights? Vancouver: The FREDA Centre for Research on Violence Against Women and Children. Available at https://www.fredacentre.com/report-parental-alienationempirical-analysis-neilson-2018

[3] Sheehy, E., & Boyd, S.B. (2020). Penalizing women’s fear: intimate partner violence and parental alienation in Canadian child custody cases. Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 42(1), 80–91. Available at https://doi.org/10.1080/09649069.2020.1701 940

[4] United Nations Human Rights Council Report by Special Rapporteur Reem Alsalem (19 June 2023). A/HRC/53/36.

[5] Wilson v Sinclair, 2022 ONSC 2154 https://www.canlii.org/en/on/onsc/doc/2022/2022onsc2154/2022onsc2154.html?autocompleteStr=%20Wilson%20v%20Sinclair%2C%202022%20ONSC%20215&autocompletePos=1

[6] Neilson, Linda C. (2013). Enhancing Safety: When Domestic Violence Cases are in Multiple Legal Systems (Criminal, family, child protection): A Family Law, Domestic Violence Perspective. Available at https://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/lf-fl/famil/renfo-enhan/p1.html

[7] Ontario Domestic Violence Death Review Committee (Ontario DVDRC). (2018). Domestic Violence Death Review Committee 2018 annual report. Toronto: Office of the Chief Coroner.

[8] The Canadian Press and News Staff. “Two three-year-old boys murdered by their 46-year-old father: Quebec provincial police”. CityNews, 26 August 2023, https://montreal.citynews.ca/2023/08/26/children-killed-father-sq/. Accessed 03 November 2023.


 

Demande d’interdiction de la tactique légale nocive «d’aliénation parentale » et de « thérapie de réunification »


Le 8 novembre 2023


Les survivantes canadiennes de violence conjugale et du système judiciaire font appel au gouvernement du Canada et à tous les membres parlementaires, afin de protéger les enfants canadien(ne)s. Nous demandons au gouvernement et aux membres parlementaires de mettre immédiatement en place les recommandations du rapport Nations Unies rapporteuse spéciale des Nations Unies en matière de violence contre les femmes et les filles, ses causes et ses conséquences. Ce rapport a été présenté au Conseil des droits de l’homme lors de sa cinquante-troisième session.


La pétition e-4517, déposée à la chambre des communes, a recueilli plus de mille signatures. En pièce jointe, vous trouverez une lettre qui appuie la pétition signée par plus de 60 organismes dévoués contre la violence envers les femmes. La lettre a été envoyée au chef des parties fédérales et au premier ministre, le très honorable Justin Trudeau.


La tactique d’aliénation parentale utilisée dans les Tribunaux de la famille, suggère que le parent protecteur (le parent avec qui l’enfant trouve sa sécurité) cause intentionnellement la peur d’un enfant envers l’autre parent abuseur et abusif. Le parent protecteur et/ou l’enfant sont souvent des victimes de violence conjugale dans ces cas juridiques.


L’outil de la thérapie de réunification est un outil légal utilisé par le parent abuseur-abusif pour séparer l’enfant du parent protecteur et pour continuer d’exercer le contrôle sur l’enfant et le parent protecteur après une séparation. Les Tribunaux de la famille ont extradé des enfants du Canada pour fins de thérapie de réunification dans d'autres pays. Ces Tribunaux enlèvent les enfants, par la force, de leurs parents protecteurs et les envoient vivre avec leur parent abuseur-abusif, comme option ou solution d’en addition à la thérapie de réunification.[1] Il s’agit de de tactiques d’abus post-séparation utilisées à l’encontre des enfants et de leurs parents protecteurs affectant grandement le bien-être psychologique et physique de ces derniers. Résultant d’une violation au droit de la sécurité des enfants en vertu de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés.


Nous faisons au gouvernement du Canada et aux membres parlementaires dans le but de PROTÉGER le bien-être psychologique et physique de tous les enfants au Canada en faisant ce qui suit :


1. Adopter des changements législatifs pour interdire l’utilisation de l’aliénation parentale et les pseudo-concepts connexes tel que recommandé par la rapporteuse spéciale de l’UNHCR.


  • L’aliénation parentale et la thérapie de réunification sont des outils d’une personne abusive pour continuer le contrôle et l'abus post-séparation. Il s’agit de des tactiques communes en réponse aux allégations d’abus.

  • 41,5 % des cas d’aliénation parentale implique la violence conjugale ou l’abus envers un enfant.[2]

  • Dans les 40 % des cas, où on accuse un parent protecteur d’aliénation, la violence conjugale est jugée non pertinente aux intérêts supérieurs des enfants. Les femmes sont déclarées comme aliénantes résultant d'un changement négatif de la garde avec un taux de 48 %.[3]

2. Adopter des changements législatifs pour l'interdiction de la thérapie de réunification et ces concepts connexes (y compris, sans s’y limiter aux programmes d’éducation.) La pratique qui vise à envoyer les résident(e)s canadien(ne)s vers des juridictions étrangères doit être interdite.


  • Aucune formation n’existe, et la pratique n’a pas été validée. En particulier, les « camps de réunification » ont été dénoncés dans le rapport des Nations Unies susmentionné.[4]

  • Les enfants canadien(ne)s sont envoyés aux États-Unis dans les « camps de réunification ». Par exemple, dans le cas de Wilson v. Sinclair, les enfants ont été envoyés à « Turning Points » dans l'État de New York.[5]

3. En collaboration avec les provinces et territoires, prendre des mesures concises pour protéger les droits de la personne en vertu de la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, ainsi que la convention des Nations Unies relative aux droits de l’enfant.


  • Malgré « le lien établi entre la violence conjugale coercitive et des formes directes de violence faite aux enfants ainsi que les pratiques parentales préjudiciables », le système judiciaire en droit de la famille continue de démontrer une compréhension limitée du lien entre la violence conjugale et le risque envers les enfants.[6]

  • Plusieurs cas d’homicide domestique ont été présentés dans les médias et démontrent encore une fois, une absence de prise en considération des facteurs de risque contribuant à l’escalade, et ce, malgré la recherche très documentée à cet égard (consulter le rapport annuel de 2018, Comité d’examen des décès dus à la violence familiale de l’Ontario[7]). Par exemple, deux jeunes garçons ont été assassinés dans la région de Montréal en août 2023 après que le père a été accusé d’harcèlement criminel envers la mère.[8]


Pour ceux et celles qui sont intéressé(e)s à se joindre à la cause de la sécurité et des droits des enfants canadien(ne)s, nous vous prions d’envoyer une lettre à votre député(e) fédéral(e) et à votre député(e) provincial(e). Un exemple de ladite lettre se trouve ici.


Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements, veuillez nous écrire à info@itbicanada.org.


[1] Y.H.P. v. J.N., 2023 ONSC 5766 and Epshtein v. Verzberger-Epshtein 2021 ONSC 7694

[2] Neilson, L. (2018). Parental alienation empirical analysis: Child best interests or parental rights? Vancouver: The FREDA Centre for Research on Violence Against Women and Children. Available at https://www.fredacentre.com/report-parental-alienationempirical-analysis-neilson-2018

[3] Sheehy, E., & Boyd, S.B. (2020). Penalizing women’s fear: intimate partner violence and parental alienation in Canadian child custody cases. Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 42(1), 80–91. Available at https://doi.org/10.1080/09649069.2020.1701 940

[4] United Nations Human Rights Council Report by Special Rapporteur Reem Alsalem (19 June 2023). A/HRC/53/36.

[5] Wilson v Sinclair, 2022 ONSC 2154 https://www.canlii.org/en/on/onsc/doc/2022/2022onsc2154/2022onsc2154.html?autocompleteStr=%20Wilson%20v%20Sinclair%2C%202022%20ONSC%20215&autocompletePos=1

[6] Neilson, Linda C. (2013). Enhancing Safety: When Domestic Violence Cases are in Multiple Legal Systems (Criminal, family, child protection): A Family Law, Domestic Violence Perspective. Available at https://www.justice.gc.ca/fra/pr-rp/lf-fl/famil/renfo-enhan/p1.html

[7] Ontario Domestic Violence Death Review Committee (Ontario DVDRC). (2018). Domestic Violence Death Review Committee 2018 annual report. Toronto: Office of the Chief Coroner. https://www.ontario.ca/fr/document/comite-dexamen-des-deces-dus-la-violence-familiale-rapport-annuel-2018

[8] The Canadian Press and News Staff. “Two three-year-old boys murdered by their 46-year-old father: Quebec provincial police”. CityNews, 26 August 2023, https://montreal.citynews.ca/2023/08/26/children-killed-father-sq/. Accessed 03 November 2023.



Media Release Nov 8 2023 (English)
.pdf
Download PDF • 213KB

Media Release Nov 8 2023 (French)
.pdf
Download PDF • 222KB

Letter to Federal Leaders Regarding UN HRC Recommendations
.pdf
Download PDF • 108KB


359 views0 comments

Commentaires


bottom of page